General

The evil of Monsanto and GMOs explained: Bad technology, endless greed and the destruction of humanity

by Mike Adams

 (NaturalNews) By now, nearly all informed people recognize that Monsanto is widely regarded as the most evil corporation on our planet. But what, exactly, makes Monsanto so evil? Why is Monsanto worse than a pharmaceutical company, a pesticide company or even a weapons manufacturer?

The answer to this question is found in probing the virtue of the corporation in question. As virtuous people, we expect corporations to act with a sense of fundamental human decency. We expect them to behave within the boundaries of respecting human life, honest business practices and reliable science. We (naively) wish that corporations would act like decent human beings.

But they don’t. In their quest for profit at any cost, they violate the basic tenets of virtue. They betray humanity. They destroy life. They malign Mother Nature herself, and in doing so, they threaten the very future of sustainable life on our planet.

Here, I unravel the fundamental “violations of virtue” that Monsanto practices on a daily basis. It is these things, I think you’ll agree, that make Monsanto a despicable corporate entity and a threat to all humankind.

Corporate greed over service to humanity

Monsanto’s actions are designed to maximize its corporate profits, not to serve the people. Its entire seed-and-herbicide business model is designed to trap farmers in a system of economic dependence… to turn farmers into indentured servants who can never return to traditional farming after their soil has been destroyed with Roundup.

Death over life

Monsanto’s products cause death. They compromise and violate life. Monsanto’s GM corn grown a toxic chemical right inside each and every corn kernel. This corn is what is subsequently eaten by humans.

In a recent scientific study, a shocking 70 percent of female rats died prematurely when fed GMOs. Fifty percent of males died early. Almost all of them died from cancer tumors.

Secrecy over transparency

Monsanto is spending millions of dollars to try to defeat Proposition 37 in California — a bill which would simply require GMOs to be indicated on food labels.

But Monsanto and other companies such as those that own Larabar, Silk and Kashi do not want consumers to know the truth about GMOs in the foods they buy. (See the GMO boycott infographic here.) They’re also spending huge sums of money to try to defeat Proposition 37 so that the food companies can keep GMOs a dirty little secret about the poison in your food.

Plainly stated, these companies do not want you to know what you’re eating. And why? Because you’re eating poison!

Domination of technology rather than sharing of wisdom

Monsanto does not create technology and then share wisdom with farmers; instead the company patents its GE seeds and thereby claims monopolistic ownership over them. This patent is used to punish farmers!

When Monsanto’s GMO seeds blow into the fields of farmers who are trying to avoid growing GMOs, Monsanto uses its patent “rights” to sue the farmers and claim they “stole” Monsanto property!

This is an example of the kind of pure evil Monsanto engages in on a regular basis. From the top company executives to the bottom of the corporate ladder, people who work for Monsanto are engaged in promoting a sickening, unprecedented evil that’s spreading across our planet like a black slimy cancer tumor.

That’s no coincidence, either, considering that eating GMOs causes massive cancer tumors.

Artificial manipulation of nature rather than honoring of nature

Instead of working with the beauty, the genius and the abundance that has already been engineered into nature, Monsanto seeks to violate nature, overriding healthy plant genes with poison genes that generate insecticides right inside the crops.

Instead of honoring the natural ability of seeds to reproduce generation after generation, Monsanto develops “terminator seed” technology that causes seeds to self-terminate after one generation. This, by itself, is a heinous crime against nature, humankind and planet Earth. It is a crime worse than the Nazi holocaust, for terminator seeds threaten ALL human life on our planet… billions of lives are threatened by the behavior of Monsanto.

Environmental destruction over environmental stewardship

Roundup herbicide devastates soils, rendering them contaminated and unable to produce healthy crops using traditional (or organic) farming methods. Once a farm plot is destroyed with Roundup, that farmer is forever enslaved to a chemical-based farming protocol. It’s unhealthy, it’s a disaster to the environment, and the actual crop yields are LOWER than with organic farming, over a period of five years or more.

By encouraging farmers to spray literally millions of acres of farmland with Roundup, Monsanto is engaged in a conspiracy to destroy our agricultural heritage and turn us all into “food slaves” that must pay tribute to Monsatan.

Scientific deception over scientific truth

The so-called “science” coming out of Monsanto is some of the most inane, malicious and brutally deceptive junk science ever fabricated by corporate science sellouts. Instead of testing GMOs for long durations on animals, Monsanto-funded scientists test GMOs for a mere 90 days and then adamantly declare the food to be “safe” for a lifetime of consumption by humans.

It’s no wonder they didn’t run long-term tests: The real acceleration in cancer tumors only emerged after the 90-day milestone in rats.

Even if Monsanto-funded scientists found GMOs to be safe in a “lifetime” feeding study, you couldn’t trust those results anyway: Any scientist, politician or media group with financial ties to Monsanto must now be assumed to be compromised and lacking any credibility whatsoever. Monsanto has bought off countless scientists, experts, media writers and politicians. But paying them off doesn’t alter reality. Poison in the corn is still poison in the corn, even if you pay a group of sellout scientists to foolishly declare otherwise.

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Unbeetable

 The Humble Root Which Fights Cancer, Boosts Endurance & Lowers Blood Pressure

With its sweet, earthy taste and ruby-red interior, beetroot is a favorite of foodies, but there’s far more to it than that.

We explain how the secret weapon of sports stars increases fitness and can help stave off cancer…

HALE AND HEARTY

The majority of beetroot’s benefits stem from the unusually high levels of nitrates it contains – gram for gram it possesses about 20 times more than most other vegetables.

Nitrates have suffered a bad reputation because of their use as a food additive.

Animal experiments had linked their commercial use to  cancer and in the Sixties the World Health Organisation set upper limits on their use. However, recent studies have shown that nitrates in beetroot lower blood pressure._634x405

A 2010 study carried out by Queen Mary’s University in London found that drinking just one 250ml glass of beetroot juice a day dramatically lowered blood pressure for several hours.

It also found that the higher the blood pressure, the greater the drop observed.

A new study carried out by the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute in Melbourne, Australia, found that a 500ml glass of the juice led to a significant drop in blood pressure  after six hours. If beetroot juice was consumed widely, researchers say we could see a ten per cent reduction in death from cardiovascular disease.

Nitrates lower blood pressure because bacteria in the mouth and gut convert it into the gas nitric oxide, which relaxes and widens the blood vessels, allowing blood to circulate more freely.

ATHLETE’S CHOICE

Studies carried out by the University of Exeter have shown that nitrates not only lower blood  pressure but improve stamina too.

A 2010 study found that adults who drank 500ml of the juice a day could exercise 16 per cent longer than those given a drink supplement with nitrates removed.

‘Nitrates work in synergy with the other antioxidants that beetroot  contains to reduce the oxygen needed by muscles,’ says Stephen Bailey, who worked on the study. ‘This enables them to work more efficiently and slows fatigue.’

Indeed, disabled athlete David Weir put some of his gold medal-winning success at the London Paralympics last summer down to a regular intake of beetroot juice. England rugby player Ben Foden as well as marathon runner Helen  Davies also rate the drink as a great endurance booster.

BRAIN BOOSTER

A 2011 study carried out by Wake Forest University in North Carolina found beetroot may slow the progression of dementia.

It is thought this is because nitric oxide boosts blood flow to the brain. Beetroot’s high folic acid content – approximately 75 per cent of your recommended daily allowance (RDA) in just two or three small beetroots – may also play a role as previous research has suggested the nutrient protects against Alzheimer’s.

FIGHTING CANCER

Betacyanin, the pigment that gives beetroot its rich hue, is a powerful antioxidant that has been shown to possess anti-cancer properties.

In 2011, a study carried out by Howard University in Washington, USA,  found that betacyanin slowed tumour growth by 12.5 per cent when exposed to prostate and breast cancer cells.

More research needs to be carried out to see if consuming beetroot would have a similar  anti-cancer effect._beetroot-juice

HIGH IN FIBRE

Nutritional therapist Dr  Elisabeth Philipps recommends the vegetable for digestive troubles.

‘Beetroot is high in fibre and a 100g portion – about two or three small beetroot – contains ten per cent of your RDA, which helps regulate bowel movements,’ she says.

‘It also contains a substance called betaine which normalises stomach acid secretion.’

The compound increases acid levels in the stomach if you do not have enough and acts as an antacid if you are producing too much. ‘Beetroot supports the liver too,’ she adds.

‘Antioxidants vulgaxanthin, betalain and betanin promote the production of glutathione, a  substance that helps the liver  process toxins.’

IN THE PINK

Between ten and 14 per cent of the population experience the phenomenon known as beeturia – when the urine turns pink – after eating  beetroot. It usually occurs when a person consumes a large quantity.

‘It isn’t fully understood why this occurs although it has been linked to anaemia,’ says Dr Philipps. ‘If your urine only changes in colour when you eat beetroot, it is nothing to be concerned about.’

Source:

www.dailymail.co.uk

Curly

Healthy Skin

Many of us already know that eating fruits and vegetables makes us healthy and energetic. We also know from experience that food and beauty are related. Now we have further evidence from research from University of St. Andrews that fruit and vegetable intake is also associated with healthy glowing skin.

Carotenoids make your skin glow

According to the research published recently in the American Journal of Public Health, carotenoids in the fruits are responsible for the healthy skin glow. Carotenoids are the red, yellow and orange pigments found in fruits and vegetables.

Lycopene, which is a carotenoid in tomatoes and red peppers, provides the red pigment. Beta carotene, which is a carotenoid in carrot and green leafy vegetables, provides the yellow pigment. These carotenoids deposit under the skin and provide several health benefits.

Beauty is linked to fruit and vegetable consumption

In this study, the scientists followed the dietary patterns of 35 students over a period of six weeks. The group did not use any make-up. They also did not get any significant UV ray exposure from the sun or self-tanning machines recently.

These students filled out food frequency questionnaires which provided scientists data around fruit and vegetable consumption. Potatoes were not counted as vegetables in this study.

They recorded the change in skin color and compared perceived attractiveness among these students.

At the end of the study, they found that students who ate more fruits andvegetables had a healthy golden skin. On the contrary, students who reduced the amount looked less attractive by the end of the study.

Skin tone becomes attractive with as little as three additional portions a day

You do not have to gorge yourself with lots of fruits and vegetables for a long period of time. Adding just two extra portions had a noticeable effect on attractiveness within a period of six weeks.

To be precise, eating additional 2.91 portions per day would make you look healthy. Eating additional 3.3 portions of fruits and vegetables would make you look attractive.

On average, one portion of fruit or vegetable is equivalent to 80g. For example, one apple, banana or orange will count as one portion.

Although this study focused on the link between the change in skin tone from carotenoids and attractiveness, previous studies showed that fruits and vegetables have several vitamins and minerals which improve skin health and slow down the aging process.

Chelsea Physic Garden

Chelsea Physic Garden, an independent charity committed to the conservation and demonstration of plants used by mankind.

Situated in the heart of London, Chelsea Physic Garden has a unique living collection of around 5,000 different edible, useful, medicinal and historical plants. This ‘hidden gem’ is also a peaceful green oasis in which to enjoy a relaxing stroll with an award-winning Café and a Book & Gift Shop.

London’s oldest botanic garden, Chelsea Physic Garden was founded in 1673 by the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries for the purpose of training apprentices in identifying plants. It subsequently became one of the most important centres of botany and plant exchange in the world.

The Garden’s warm microclimate means that many tender plants can flourish including a number of rare and endangered species. It has the largest outdoor fruiting olive tree in Britain and the world’s most northerly outdoor grapefruit tree. From pomegranates to ginkgos, mulberries to eucalyptus, there are over 100 different types of tree in the Garden, many of which are rare in Britain. In the glasshouses there is a collection of tropical and sub-tropical species and a Victorian Cool Fernery.

The Garden of Edible and Useful Plants

The Garden of Edible and Useful Plants displays an extraordinary range of plant species on which humanity depends; from forest fruits and land restoration plants to superfoods and plants used for hygiene, science and the arts. The new garden showcases a diverse collection of productive and functional plants, incorporating both the beautiful and bizarre.

The design, which features a series of interlinked spaces, is inspired by 18th century potagers and Chelsea Physic Garden’s historic layout. Raised beds house the plant displays and their explanatory information panels, while other areas are dedicated to teaching and secluded seating spaces.

Exciting new features include a compact vineyard, a living plant amphitheatre and a stone pier to view Robert Fortune’s tank pond. The garden is bound together with traditional clay paving bricks and green oak arches which lead visitors through the plantings.

The new garden aims to bring people closer to the plants which are inextricably woven into our everyday lives.

More about this here

16 Foods That’ll Re-Grow from Kitchen Scraps

By Andy Whiteley

Looking for a healthy way to get more from your garden? Like to know your food is free of the pesticides and other nasties that are often sprayed on commercial crops? Re-growing food from your kitchen scraps is a good way to do it!

There’s nothing like eating your own home- grown vegies, and there are heaps of different foods that will re- grow from the scrap pieces that you’d normally throw out or put into your compost bin.

It’s fun. And very simple … if you know how to do it.

Just remember … the quality of the “parent” vegetable scrap will help to determine the quality of the re-growth. So, wherever possible, I recommend buying local organic produce, so you know your re-grown plants are fresh, healthy and free of chemical and genetic meddling.

Leeks, Scallions, Spring Onions and Fennel

You can either use the white root end of a vegetable that you have already cut, or buy a handful of new vegetables to use specifically for growing.

Simply place the white root end in a glass jar with a little water, and leave it in a sunny position. I keep mine in the kitchen window. The green leafy part of the plant will continue to shoot. When it’s time to cook, just snip off what you need from the green growth and leave the white root end in water to keep growing. Freshen up the water each week or so, and you’ll never have to buy them again.

Lemongrass

Lemongrass grows just like any other grass. To propagate it, place the root end (after you’ve cut the rest off) in a glass jar with a little water, and leave it in a sunny position.

Within a week or so, new growth will start to appear. Transplant your lemongrass into a pot and leave it in a sunny outdoor position. You can harvest your lemongrass when the stalks reach around a foot tall – just cut off what you need and leave the plant to keep growing.

Celery, Bok Choi, Romaine Lettuce & Cabbage

Similar to leeks, these vegetables will re-grow from the white root end. Cut the stalks off as you normally would, and place the root end in a shallow bowl of water – enough to cover the roots but not the top of your cutting. Place it in a sunny window position, occasionally spraying your cutting with water to keep the top moist.

After a few days, you should start to see roots and new leaves appear. After a week or so, transplant it into soil with just the leaves showing above the level of the soil. The plant will continue to grow, and within a few weeks it will sprout a whole new head.

Alternatively you can plant your cutting directly into soil (without starting the process in water) but you will need to keep the soil very moist for the first week until the new shoots start to appear.

Ginger

Ginger is very easy to re-grow. Simply plant a spare piece of ginger rhizome (the thick knobbly bit you cook with) in potting soil with the newest (ie. smallest) buds facing upward. Ginger enjoys filtered, not direct, sunlight in a warm moist environment.

Before long it will start to grow new shoots and roots. Once the plant is established and you’re ready to harvest, pull up the whole plant, roots and all. Remove a piece of the rhizome, and re-plant it to repeat the process.

Ginger also makes a very attractive house-plant, so if you don’t use a lot of ginger in your cooking you can still enjoy the lovely plant between harvests.

Potatoes

Re-growing potatoes is a great way to avoid waste, as you can re-grow potatoes from any old potato that has ‘eyes’ growing on it. Pick a potato that has robust eyes, and cut it into pieces around 2 inches square, ensuring each piece has at least one or two eyes. Leave the cut pieces to sit at room temperature for a day or two, which allows the cut areas to dry and callous over. This prevents the potato piece from rotting after you plant it, ensuring that the new shoots get the maximum nutrition from each potato piece.

Potato plants enjoy a high-nutrient environment, so it is best to turn compost through your soil before you plant them. Plant your potato pieces around 8 inches deep with the eye facing upward, and cover it with around 4 inches of soil, leaving the other 4 inches empty. As your plant begins to grow and more roots appear, add more soil. If your plant really takes off, mound more soil around the base of the plant to help support its growth.

Garlic

You can re-grow a plant from just a single clove – just plant it, root-end down, in a warm position with plenty of direct sunlight. The garlic will root itself and produce new shoots. Once established, cut back the shoots and the plant will put all its energy into producing a tasty big garlic bulb. And like ginger, you can repeat the process with your new bulb.

 

Onions

Onions are one of the easiest vegetables to propagate. Just cut off the root end of your onion, leaving a ½ inch of onion on the roots. Place it in a sunny position in your garden and cover the top with soil. Ensure the soil is kept moist. Onions prefer a warm sunny environment, so if you live in a colder climate, keep them in pots and move them indoors during frostier months.

As you use your home-grown onions, keep re-planting the root ends you cut off, and you’ll never need to buy onions again.

Sweet Potatoes

When planted, sweet potato will produce eye-shoots much like a potato. Bury all or part of a sweet potato under a thin layer of soil in a moist sunny location. New shoots will start to appear through the soil in a week or so. Once the shoots reach around four inches in height, remove them and re-plant them, allowing about 12 inches space between each plant. It will take around 4 months for your sweet potatoes to be ready. In the meantime, keep an eye out for slugs… they love sweet potatoes.

To propagate sweet potatoes, it is essential to use an organic source since most commercial growers spray their sweet potatoes to prevent them from shooting.

Mushroom

Mushrooms can be propagated from cuttings, but they’re one of the more difficult vegies to re-grow. They enjoy warm humidity and nutrient-rich soil, but have to compete with other fungus for survival in that environment. Although it is not their preferred climate, cooler environments give mushrooms a better chance of winning the race against other fungi.

Prepare a mix of soil and compost in a pot (not in the ground) so your re-growth is portable and you can control the temperature of your mushroom. I have found most success with a warm filtered light during the day and a cool temperature at night. Just remove the head of the mushroom and plant the stalk in the soil, leaving just the top exposed. In the right conditions, the base will grow a whole new head. (In my experience, you’ll know fairly quickly if your mushroom has taken to the soil as it will either start to grow or start to rot in the first few days).




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